Brain Aneurysm Support Community

One year anniversary post craniotomy

#1

Another positive story! My un-ruptured Annie was sucessfuly removed one year ago at UCSF. I am a 66 year old grandmother of 10, mom of 5, and wife of one! I was out of the hospital after only 3 days, back to normal life from that day on … Working, walking, playing with grandkids but taking nice winter naps. Life is good and I’ve never regretted my decision. I had breast cancer, chemo, and radiation in 2011 - 2012 and that was easier than I expected too but harder than the craniotomy, probably because it was such a long process; 9 months from diagnosis to last treatment.

If you have an unruptured Annie, only look at those discussions from others with unruptured ones; the ruptured Annie stories are damn scary and we are so lucky ours were discovered prior to rupture.

The picture of me here was taken 1 week post-op after a walk in the San Francisco hills.

0 Likes

#2

Thank you for sharing your story, because it gives me hope. I am one of the unruptured, close in age to you and fearful. Best wishes for future decades of joy surrounded by your beloved family.

0 Likes

#3

Thanks for your post! I was diagnosed in the fall; after discussions with my local neurosurgeon and the dr at UCSF, they both said I could wait 6 months and have it re-scanned, but after only a couple of months of living with it, I knew I wanted it out. Are you monitoring it or scheduled for removal? If you ever want to chat more, I am available.

0 Likes

#4

Nancy...congratulations...you were/are blessed...amd, I am so glad to read more of the success of a craniotomy...and, yes, I do know others who have not had the success level of yours...so I am practical in my thoughts...

There is the one renowned (right word?) neurosurgeon @ UCSF...

0 Likes

#5

Nancy,

I just went for a second opinion and was informed that before it could be given I would need an angiogram, which I scheduled for later this month. Unfortunately, my aneurysm is 8mm on the ACOM so it is a bit too big for monitoring and like you I am not keen to live with it. The first doctor I saw recommended endovascular coiling based on a CT scan with contrast. I expected the second doctor to tell me the same thing based on that scan, so I am a bit dismayed that I have to have an angiogram and perhaps face the possibility of a craniotomy.



Nancy said:
Thanks for your post! I was diagnosed in the fall; after discussions with my local neurosurgeon and the dr at UCSF, they both said I could wait 6 months and have it re-scanned, but after only a couple of months of living with it, I knew I wanted it out. Are you monitoring it or scheduled for removal? If you ever want to chat more, I am available.
0 Likes

#6

Mine didn’t qualify for a coiling because it was more like a bulge rather than a balloon. I know that coiling is supposed to be less risky and less invasive, but in this site I have seen people having to go back in for another coiling. I had angiograms before and after my craniotomy without problems. Mine was on the right carotid abd around 5 mm. Dr Layton at UCSF was excellent as was the other staff. My nurse even went to Pete’s Coffee at 6 am to get me a latte on post op day 2.

0 Likes

#7

Nancy...some patients have had quality coiling...others have almost not survived...or did not survive...and, well documented...thanks for the "name" reminder of Dr. Layton...

0 Likes

#8

Congrats on your 1 year Nancy! I'm 2 yr 3 mo from my craniotomy for an unrupture.

0 Likes

#9

Nancy, you are a woman of wisdom and I hope all the unruptured heed your advice! The two are the Yin and Yang of this phenomena, it’s best to stay balanced :). And a walk around The City, I envy you! My favorite places are Mt Tam and the Muir Woods, thanks for the memories. May you have a year of growth and lots of hugs!

0 Likes