My balance is an issue

this has been an issue from the time of the injury … especially rising too quick or bending over to much (and really not too much) or spinning - also, motion sickness is also an issue … it has been 2 years 1 month and it really appears that it isn’t going to get better … any suggestions?

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“…any suggestions?” Nope. Sorry.
I’m 8yrs since my last neurosurgery and still today my balance is a mess. When I stand I have to often brace myself. I have done the normal ‘stand and move’ all in one only to find myself on the floor. It was suggested it was the fluid in my ears, it’s not. I was told it maybe an issue with my eyes, it’s not and none of the dr’s I have seen have been able to assist with it all in anyway.

Merl from the Moderator Support Team

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When I first got out of ICU, my balance was horrible. I ripped my arm, thought I needed stitches, but my elderly neighbor said no and put a band aid with lots of tape, six hours later… the doc In the box glued it, an hour after that, numerous stitches. My Neurosurgeon and Neurologists have all said it was due to my rupture and possibly my lower back surgery. Tai Chi helped me immensely. There are videos on YouTube that can help you get started, when COVID-19 has passed, perhaps find a class. Our adult center gives a free class once a week. PT is also very helpful!

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My doc said that it is common to have eustachian tube dysfunction after brain surgery. Meaning, the tube bends towards the wrong angle and so fluid stays behind the ear drum. This can cause balance issues. Also, if the aneurysm is bypassed and remains in your head this can cause balance issues as well.
Ruth

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Finally, an answer that makes so much sense.

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I had a subarachnoid hemorrhage (stented) and a second aneurysm clipped three months later. I was dizzy and nauseous after that. An MRI revealed that I had hydrocephalus (my brain ventricles were enlarged), and I got a shunt. This is apparently not uncommon in these situations, because the mechanism in the normal brain that regulates cerebrospinal fluid may have been damaged. The shunt was a major relief for me. I would think, with your history and symptoms, that a neurologist would have ordered an MRI to check for hydrocephalus, but you never know! Best of luck!

I’m glad I was able to help you. There are also sills in the brain that store CSF. I have one sill that’s only ⅓ full and that causes migraines and balance issues as well.
Blessings,
Dr. Ruth Cangialosi DNP MSN RN-BC

I have a VP shunt on the left side of my brain that drains via tube behind my left ear. I caught a virus and lost hearing suddenly in my left ear 5 years ago. It is perpetually clogged even though I’m deaf. 8 years later, I do not get migraines but my balance has gotten worse. Vertigo also originates via this side. I’ve never heard of a sill. Can you explain?

I’m six and a half years post, and balance is still an issue for me as well. Just take your time and move slowly, especially when getting up.

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I had SAH Hemmorage 4-24-16. I developed hydrocephalus too. I had a shunt put in 9-3-18. I still get balance issues if I move to fast even with the shunt. Now, I can hear the drain in my left ear. I call it my sump pump. I am not sure we will ever be “normal again”, but after everything all of us have went through with this virus, none of will be normal again. I would also suggest maybe yoga or chair yoga. All we can do is work with what we have.

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Yes! I had spinning. It is caused by the crystals in your ear that have been moved out of their spot. Lon before you say, “what” search for this on YouTube and watch the method a physical therapist uses to get your vertigo fixed! It just involves sitting, sometimes wearing a camera goggles so they can see your eyes, laying, eyes moving fast, you feel like you will fall off the table then they turn your head several ways and then after they do it again. It works! Really works. Try this video on YouTube. https://youtu.be/Zx1QdbJJ3bc

Hello there,

I had similar problems after my surgery, especially when I turned my head to “quick” or if I got up from the bed to fast. but after some time (years) the balancing got better, not sure what happen but for some reason, I felt better after a few years. still not 100% but better. I asked my neurologist the same question, he told me " well you had brain surgery, is big deal"
feel better soon
Ruben.

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I am 8 years out from my rupture (which was comparatively small) and still have issues with motion sickness feelings and what I call my “off kilter” feeling and sometimes headaches, especially around crowds or where there is lots going on. My neurologist sent me to PT and I now have exercises that do help. I occasionally take Excedrin Migraine when I am unable to take a break. Also, I teach balance exercises and can’t recommend them highly enough. I am happy that there are things I can do to help, but otherwise, my neurologist and I agreed that this is my normal. I remind myself that it is a small price to pay just to still be around. Good luck to you, take it slowly, and be patient with yourself.

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I’m almost 7 years out and I’m starting to get dizzy spells. I will talk to my neurologist about it. I also take Ann injection (Ajovy) for my headaches, which I was getting a lot. The headaches have calm down. Thank God. It was kinda funny listening to people complaing About not being able to go anywhere, that’s been my normal after Anniibel. I don’t like crowds, lots of moving parts, or too much noise either. It’s nice to see the world moving at my place, and not feeling like life is passing me by. Hang in there. Take one day at a time.

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HI I am now 4 years since rupture, and my state of being is dynamic. I find that balance is a problem, when rising too quickly or as recently as last night for no reason what-so-ever. I ride a bycycle and a motorcycle with no issues at all. I do find that the balance loss is temporary (20-60sec) and mostly is followed by pain in the brain. The pain I resolve by clsoing my eyes and relaxing. I get no balance issues at all when I ride on two wheels. It seems to me to be closely related to the tuening oif my neck for prolonged periods such as when talking to someone beside you. Notice when the balance issues ocurr and what preceeds and follows. I am now fully aware of when I am talking to someone and will turn my whole body rather than my head. Hope this helps…

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KParry, I have a little tractor, when I’m mowing or whatever on a slight incline, I have noticed if my left side is on the downhill side I have little to know problems. However if my right side is on the downhill side, I feel like the tractor is going to topple sideways. Do you ever feel like that when riding your motorbike? I’m going to ask my Neurologist next telemedicine but thought you might know :slight_smile:

Moltruob,
I too have little tractor i have not noticed any balance issues, and I cut my ditches at a steep angle on both sides. It seems to me to be stress related. Not that I am stressed but when there are unfamiliar people or conflicts in play it is worse. When on my bike or lawn tractor… I am alone and stress free, no balance issues.

Thanks! I am also stress free on my little tractor for the most part. Save for the incline and right side down…and perhaps when I’ve picked up a heavier load than I should lol. From our mulch pile to the garden unfortunately I’m always right side down, even if I try backing out.

I’ve owned four motorbikes in my lifetime. The first was a Harley made in Italy. It always sprayed oil on my leg and never could find parts. Traded it for a little street Honda, upgraded to a belt driven Kawasaki (my favorite) and then a Yamaha. 3rd degree burns stopped my biking days unfortunately. And I was told after my rupture that I can no longer ride horses so the tractor it is!

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I to have balance problems from a TBI with SAH in 2016 and have not been able to ride my horse. I always hoped I would recover and get back in the saddle. Then I found out about my Annies . Surgery to coil and stent but ruptured during procedure.
Also another being watched so I’ve given up hope of ever being out with my horse.
Don’t think he’s to upset about that though…lazy and likes to eat all day :yellow_heart:

I too was told no more horseback riding…not by my Neurosurgeon, but by the Charge Nurse on the step down unit whilst I was waiting to go back into Neuro ICU. I had started vasospasms again. The Charge Nurse told the doctor who was putting me back into Neuro ICU concurred. As I don’t have horses any longer, I failed to ask my Neurosurgeon. But about a year after, my Neurosurgeon trumped my family and said I could do anything I wanted as long as I felt good. I wanted to go hang glide while we were at the coast a few years ago, it rained the day I wanted to go.

I wonder if they say no horseback riding because of the high rate of head injuries overall associated with riding? Has your Neurosurgeon told you when you can return to riding? A dear friend of ours has a barrel horse that has never been out on a trail, I offered to take the horse out on the trail for its first time. You should’ve seen the look on our friend’s face ROFLOL

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