Brain Aneurysm Support Community

Pressure in head and headache after pipeline stent


#1

I had a pipeline flow diverter put in on March 14th. I had some minimal pressure afterwards behind my right eye. I was then fine for 3 weeks. This past week whenever I bend down and get up, lift something heavy, or turn when sleeping I get a sharp pain and then a headache for a minute or so and then it passes. It is on the same side where I had the stent and in the same area. Anyone else experience this? Wondering if I should be concerned.


#2

Hi Ems067, I did a quick search of existing conversations and came across this one:

Maybe it will help? Since our members must have been enjoying Easter feasts instead of replying to posts (haha) you can also use the search bar while waiting for replies.

I hope the Easter bunny was good to you!

Meli from Moderator Support


#3

I had the surgery on March 29th carotid artery closed to the area behind my left eye. Had the pipeline…all was well for three weeks. Then, Excruciating headache for one week went to ER found that I had swelling in my brain from the blood clot forming in the aneuyrsm which was cutting off my carotid artery. High doses of steriods reduced the swelling. Don’t ignore the bad headache…if it does not get better go into the hospital. Take the pain meds. Reduction of bending…by using a stools to cook, clean or do laundry is important. Learn to be slow in your movements and move your body with your head…it will get better. Dizziness is one of the hardest things for me.


#4

I had this too, for 7 to 8 months after my stenting and coiling of my two annies(one sentinal rupture). Im one year (yay!) Out and feel NORMAL finally. The brain heals very very slowly, so give yourself time and be patient. You’ll get there!


#5

I had coiling and pipeline on June 26th. I’m having all the issues you describe. Lots of pressure bending over. Even laying flat causes pressure. Many sharp short stabbing pains. I have 3 more aneurysms that will be treated, most likely same way.
Was wondering if all these effects are results from repaired aneurysm or the remaining 3?? The pressure and dizziness all the time was a problem before surgery, but it’s worse and stabbing pains are new.


#6

Hi gpterry1972,

So what happened to the blood clot? Does it still stay inside the area?
May I know the size of it before Pipeline?
My doctors recommended me to have pipeline but I am worried about the symptom you were experienced.


#7

Okay after my first pipeline in 2011 I was fine and working in 3 weeks. Now…3 weeks post pipeline procedure for 2 aneurysms and am still getting headaches. That weird stabbing pain and also get that pressure pain.


#8

Im going to get the pipeline stent… after having this do you recommend it? TY.


#9

Did you have the stent put in? They are saying i need it … TY


#10

I opted out! I had a craniotomy instead. How many ‘pipelines’ had your doctor done so far? Had he explained to you what size of stents he had in mind to be used in your vessels? I visited 8 doctors before making the final decisions. It’s a very hard decision. My brother and my sister are still ‘watching’ their aneurysms. They don’t want to do pipeline nor craniotomy. Since no one can tell you how thin your vessel is (where the aneurysm is located), you become the one to wonder forever if you do/or don’t do anything about it. According to my surgery notes, my vessel wall was ‘almost’ transparent. (I watched the video, I could tell the blood flew on every beat. That was how thin it was. Any time it could break, I could tell you.) Judging to many comments I read/researched, pipeline could also pearce the thin vessel, of course, craniotomy could also bust the aneurysm wide open, etc. Have you studied your favorite outcome whether it’s pipeline or craniotomy? (Doctors ability is CRUCIAL here.) I will pray for your wise decision.


#11

Do you still have headaches from the crainiotomy? Im not sure I want to do that. Mine is in my parilinoid ICA area… hard to get to…


#12

Yes. Mild headaches. However, the headaches are controlled by a new device - for migraine and cluster headaches. It’s called 'GammaCore’ Sapphire. I cut down my coffee intake and started using this little machine about two months ago. It had helped a lot of headaches for me. I don’t like to take any headache medicines anymore. (I am easily clogged in my output department whenever I start taking pain medicines.)

The headaches used to bother me whenever the weather changes (snowy or bright rays of sunshine, etc). Now with that little thing, I am not afraid of headaches when they start because I can use the device to ‘zap’ myself. My neurologist even said that I can use it even before headaches start. With that sense of comfort, I found myself worried ‘less’ about headaches.

Not all people are suitable for craniotomies. I did it because my aneurysm shape is like a hat without a neck, not like a balloon. I don’t have any high blood pressure, diabetics, nor other worrisome diseases that might increase the complications after surgery. Doctors usually should evaluate the ‘favorable’ outcomes of any procedures they feel confident. So you weigh between

  1. Doctor’s specialties
  2. Doctor’s track records
  3. Facility’s/nurses support records (aftercare is crucial!!)
  4. Your confidence, you have to be 100% confident with your decision
  5. Your support system, you will need a good one at least for the first 3 months after the procedure (pipeline or stent)

I’d say that #1 & #2 determines EVERYTHING. We are totally relying on our doctors’ skills to overcome our fears.


#13

Thank you for the insights. I may go with the stent. Im still deciding which option as is my neurovascular. xo


#14

It has been 90 days since my embolization. My right opthmalic nerve was stented. And I am getting some whooper of head aches, where I just sit and cry. I did suffer from migraine in the past but that was years ago…now I have other rare Nuerological issues that have presented them self’s… called HSP heredity spastic paraglea. And some spinal stenosis in my lumbar back. I went from a marathon runner and an extreme enthusiastic to someone that is unable to walk around around the block. At what point do I call it in and get my head rechecked…I have my next angiogram in April/ May of this year 2019. But can these stents slip which is cause these head aches so bad… I have always had a talerorant to pain but this is ridiculous . I feel so bad for my husband who try’s to do make thing better but pain is pain pain…and believe you me I try to hide it the best I can


#15

Hey Terezza,
I can empathize completely. The headaches can be simply beyond measure. Some have said to me ‘Ohh I get headaches…’ and I say ‘Not like these you don’t’. I’ve had headaches for years and managed the best way I could, then they operated and OMG, this isn’t a headache, this is a mind numbing excruciating nauseating EXPLOSION of pain. For me its behind my eyes and at times I’m tempted to dig my eyeballs out with a T-spoon. The intensity is just beyond measure. The neuros wanted me to give my pain a rating out of 10, I said 15. The nurse said to me ‘Ohh it can’t be THAT bad’. I told her to lay on the floor and I’d boot her in the head. She was offended by my reply, but not as offended as I was by her statement. Others who have not been here just have no comprehension of how bad it can be, trying to explain it is impossible. Often words just can’t do it.

I have been back to the neurosurgeon and tried to query why. But the reaction from the neuro was less than welcoming. He was of the opinion I was trying to attribute blame, which I’m not. I was looking for answers, ways to manage, not placing blame. He told me I simply have a low tolerance to pain, which is false. I do however (now) have a low tolerance for the medical profession.

My wife is my rock. She tries to do everything she can to make it manageable and I too try to hide my pain, but she can see through my masquerade. She can read my eyes and as my pain radiates from my eyes, there’s no hiding it.

My recommendation is to follow through with the angio, follow through with whatever scans or tests are recommended by the dr’s, BUT, do not be going in with any great expectations. If you do not have expectations you cannot be disappointed when those expectations cannot be met. If they find something that can be resolved surgically or with medications, that’s a bonus, a welcome surprise. I didn’t do that I had an expectation and was sorely disappointed when I was told that “…this is about as good as it’s going to get. So manage.” It’s been a battle ever since.

Merl from the Moderator Support Team