Need help and support

I have a 11mm aneurysm with the neck being 7mm behind my right eye. I am petrified of having this surgery. I am very drug sensitive and the thought of months on blood thinners is very frightening. I also lost an uncle from aneurysm surgery and another uncle from a rupture. So afraid and confused. Entire family wants me to have surgery. I am trying to wrap my mind around this to make a decision but right now I feel doomed either way. Can use some help for sure and prayers that this doesn’t rupture while I am trying to figure this out. I came closer this week in realizing I have to have surgery eventually.
Mary

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I had the surgery in Feb. for an Annie between my eyes on the ACOM. My aneurysm was smaller than yours, but because it had a wide opening like yours it required a stent. Not totally comparable, but close enough to reply to you. Like you I was “petrified,” but I was much more afraid of a rupture, particularly after reviewing the odds and horrible outcomes from a rupture, so I went forward.



Yes, the Plavix was miserable, I was black and blue for the entire six months I took it.My skin looked like parchment, like I was slowly being mummified, but one month after discontinuing it my skin is returning to normal, plus I am now bruise free. It was a small price to pay, considering the alternative.



The aspirin and Plavix were at first hard on my stomach, so I took Zantac. It did not help. I learned the best way to address this was by not taking the pills together, eating a half peeled apple every morning before breakfast and dissolving my uncoated aspirin in a huge glass of water.



Two weeks ago, my dear friend, who has been a rock for me during my travails of the past two years had a major stroke, an SAH. She is fighting for her life in the ICU. I never dreamed this would happen to her, I thought it would be me, which is why I went through with the surgery-to spare my family. I will include you in prayers, when I pray for my beloved friend.

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Thank you so much for responding. I am so sorry about your friend. I will also keep you both in my prayers. How long ago was your surgery and what was your recovery like?



Campanile said:

I had the surgery in Feb. for an Annie between my eyes on the ACOM. My aneurysm was smaller than yours, but because it had a wide opening like yours it required a stent. Not totally comparable, but close enough to reply to you. Like you I was “petrified,” but I was much more afraid of a rupture, particularly after reviewing the odds and horrible outcomes from a rupture, so I went forward.


Yes, the Plavix was miserable, I was black and blue for the entire six months I took it.My skin looked like parchment, like I was slowly being mummified, but one month after discontinuing it my skin is returning to normal, plus I am now bruise free. It was a small price to pay, considering the alternative.



The aspirin and Plavix were at first hard on my stomach, so I took Zantac. It did not help. I learned the best way to address this was by not taking the pills together, eating a half peeled apple every morning before breakfast and dissolving my uncoated aspirin in a huge glass of water.



Two weeks ago, my dear friend, who has been a rock for me during my travails of the past two years had a major stroke, an SAH. She is fighting for her life in the ICU. I never dreamed this would happen to her, I thought it would be me, which is why I went through with the surgery-to spare my family. I will include you in prayers, when I pray for my beloved friend.

My surgery wasn’t long, two hours maybe, but frankly I cannot recall exactly. My recovery was not speedy, only because I had a difficult intubation. My throat was raw for about two weeks, but I did not have even a tiny bruise from the surgery.

Before I decided on the surgery I met with an eye surgeon on another matter. Once he reviewed my file he was adamant that I not delay another day, in fact, he said “I would tell my wife, my daughter, my sister what I am telling you. Take care of this. You are lucky it was found.”

My surgeon said the same about telling his loved ones to have the surgery. Why the intubation?

Mary....welcome to this site...and anticipate you will have good info..

Regarding surgery...how did the neuro-doc(s) explain the comparison of long-term open surgery or the apx 2-decades of coils/stent pseudo-surgery in the groin for the arterial access in the brain...

Which 'procedure' did the neuro-docs recommend?

Blessings and prayers for your comfort in your decision.

patio...

The intubation was for anesthesia.

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prayers! i lost uncle too, they will be proud of us!, keep strong keep positive! you can do this! tc

oh no Campanille! so sorry! prayers!



Campanile said:

I had the surgery in Feb. for an Annie between my eyes on the ACOM. My aneurysm was smaller than yours, but because it had a wide opening like yours it required a stent. Not totally comparable, but close enough to reply to you. Like you I was "petrified," but I was much more afraid of a rupture, particularly after reviewing the odds and horrible outcomes from a rupture, so I went forward.

Yes, the Plavix was miserable, I was black and blue for the entire six months I took it.My skin looked like parchment, like I was slowly being mummified, but one month after discontinuing it my skin is returning to normal, plus I am now bruise free. It was a small price to pay, considering the alternative.

The aspirin and Plavix were at first hard on my stomach, so I took Zantac. It did not help. I learned the best way to address this was by not taking the pills together, eating a half peeled apple every morning before breakfast and dissolving my uncoated aspirin in a huge glass of water.

Two weeks ago, my dear friend, who has been a rock for me during my travails of the past two years had a major stroke, an SAH. She is fighting for her life in the ICU. I never dreamed this would happen to her, I thought it would be me, which is why I went through with the surgery-to spare my family. I will include you in prayers, when I pray for my beloved friend.

Stent and coils are his recommendation.



patioplans said:

Mary…welcome to this site…and anticipate you will have good info…

Regarding surgery…how did the neuro-doc(s) explain the comparison of long-term open surgery or the apx 2-decades of coils/stent pseudo-surgery in the groin for the arterial access in the brain…

Which ‘procedure’ did the neuro-docs recommend?

Blessings and prayers for your comfort in your decision.

patio…

I hope I can.



ronk said:

prayers! i lost uncle too, they will be proud of us!, keep strong keep positive! you can do this! tc

You can do this Mary! If I could, you can. I had to wait a year, due to a chronic, insidious pain condition that put me in a wheelchair/crutches. Fortunately, I achieved my goal to be on my feet to have the surgery. Try not to worry. We will be here thinking of you.

Thank you Mary and Ronk for your prayers. My friend really needs them.

Thank so much. I am trying my best.



Campanile said:

You can do this Mary! If I could, you can. I had to wait a year, due to a chronic, insidious pain condition that put me in a wheelchair/crutches. Fortunately, I achieved my goal to be on my feet to have the surgery. Try not to worry. We will be here thinking of you.


Thank you Mary and Ronk for your prayers. My friend really needs them.

thank you all, thats heartwarming!

1-13263909_1019539841486812_96009698040212089_n.jpg (30.2 KB)

patioplans said:

Mary....welcome to this site...and anticipate you will have good info..

Regarding surgery...how did the neuro-doc(s) explain the comparison of long-term open surgery or the apx 2-decades of coils/stent pseudo-surgery in the groin for the arterial access in the brain...

Which 'procedure' did the neuro-docs recommend?

Blessings and prayers for your comfort in your decision.

patio...

coils/stent pseudo-surgery in the groin for the arterial access in the brain…

Mary...

You may want to browse data online to open questions to your neuro-docs..

The name/segment of the artery involved...

Several of the easiest (in my non-expert opinion) websites are on the brain and/or the arteries...

which may be helpful to you and your family. I had posted some under 'resources' over time; and, more recently found a few noted here.

RE: Arteries: https://quizlet.com/38435161/anatomy-and-physiology-2-chapter

RE: Brain anatomy: http://www.wou.edu/_lemastm/Teaching/BI335/Laboratory which is of

Western Oregon U...

RE: http://image/slidesharecdn.com/humanbrain-150331072630-conv... (my first choice for intro)

This one is more likely to be found by searching: longitudinal fissure and anatomy to the 'images" go to Specific Sulci/Fissures (the lists of images of various subjects on google) and the (at least current) third line of images, it is the last one on that line...when using the 'visit' section, it brings up the 38 'slide' pages...of the 'college of dentistry'... I have found this so interesting bc I took images of my 'procedure' in to my dentist... totally unknowing of 'all' the brain dental students are taught ...and, this is just the intro...of course, I realized the need to know about various portions...and, had not realized so much...

Another site: http://www.human-memory.net/brain_parts.html which has a copyright of 2010...

There are numerous other sites on the 'anatomy-physiology' of our brain and cerebral arteries. Some are just easier to read/comprehend...well, and, I am only noting my own 'comprehension - ability'...

These sites above are national and international...

Hope you keep us updated...and, so highly recommend you call your neuro-doc's office and ask for the name of the artery a/w/a which segment of that artery...and, again. hope you/family can view the sites (many more than these)...



Mary said:

coils/stent pseudo-surgery in the groin for the arterial access in the brain...

Mary,

Discovery an aneurysm is a scary thing but with advanced in medical technology, there is a lot of confidence for a successful procedure and recovery. Since you have 2 aneurysm, you may required two different procedures. Where do you live? In UCSF, there are specialists in multiple techniques (coiling, pipeline, clipping). In my case, I had no choice as I had a ruptured aneurysm and had emergency procedure. Luckily, the surgeon at my local hospital is a highly skilled surgeon with ability with both procedures (coiling and clipping).

I agree with Patioplans. It is good to have some knowledge of the artery, the brain, and surgical procedures.

This site provides background on artery systems, examples of coiling/pipelines/stents

http://neuroangio.org

This site is online neuroscience site. It has a lot of information but helped me educate myself in the area of brain that was impacted by my aneurysm.

http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/toc.htm

I hope that you find the right NeuroSurgeon for successful surgery.

Thank you so much for all the information. Some would not open for me. I will try on another computer. I get very overwhelmed trying to research this and more confused. Do you feel going through the artery is worse than open brain?



patioplans said:

Mary…

You may want to browse data online to open questions to your neuro-docs…

The name/segment of the artery involved…

Several of the easiest (in my non-expert opinion) websites are on the brain and/or the arteries…

which may be helpful to you and your family. I had posted some under ‘resources’ over time; and, more recently found a few noted here.

RE: Arteries: https://quizlet.com/38435161/anatomy-and-physiology-2-chapter

RE: Brain anatomy: http://www.wou.edu/_lemastm/Teaching/BI335/Laboratory which is of

Western Oregon U…

RE: http://image/slidesharecdn.com/humanbrain-150331072630-conv… (my first choice for intro)

This one is more likely to be found by searching: longitudinal fissure and anatomy to the 'images" go to Specific Sulci/Fissures (the lists of images of various subjects on google) and the (at least current) third line of images, it is the last one on that line…when using the ‘visit’ section, it brings up the 38 ‘slide’ pages…of the ‘college of dentistry’… I have found this so interesting bc I took images of my ‘procedure’ in to my dentist… totally unknowing of ‘all’ the brain dental students are taught …and, this is just the intro…of course, I realized the need to know about various portions…and, had not realized so much…

Another site: http://www.human-memory.net/brain_parts.html which has a copyright of 2010…

There are numerous other sites on the ‘anatomy-physiology’ of our brain and cerebral arteries. Some are just easier to read/comprehend…well, and, I am only noting my own ‘comprehension - ability’…

These sites above are national and international…

Hope you keep us updated…and, so highly recommend you call your neuro-doc’s office and ask for the name of the artery a/w/a which segment of that artery…and, again. hope you/family can view the sites (many more than these)…



Mary said:

coils/stent pseudo-surgery in the groin for the arterial access in the brain…

Thanks so much for this information. It helped a lot. I’m not understanding much at all. Too much. It says I can call them for advice. I will give it a try.



2Fight said:

Mary,

Discovery an aneurysm is a scary thing but with advanced in medical technology, there is a lot of confidence for a successful procedure and recovery. Since you have 2 aneurysm, you may required two different procedures. Where do you live? In UCSF, there are specialists in multiple techniques (coiling, pipeline, clipping). In my case, I had no choice as I had a ruptured aneurysm and had emergency procedure. Luckily, the surgeon at my local hospital is a highly skilled surgeon with ability with both procedures (coiling and clipping).

I agree with Patioplans. It is good to have some knowledge of the artery, the brain, and surgical procedures.

This site provides background on artery systems, examples of coiling/pipelines/stents

http://neuroangio.org

This site is online neuroscience site. It has a lot of information but helped me educate myself in the area of brain that was impacted by my aneurysm.

http://neuroscience.uth.tmc.edu/toc.htm

I hope that you find the right NeuroSurgeon for successful surgery.