Confusion about Brain Aneurysms

I am getting a little confused the more I read everyones stories and articles online. My Mom had her aneurysm in September 09… She was in a coma for around 2 months and semi-comatosed for another 4. Its seems that she was “out” much longer than normal. She still is not functioning at any “normal” level. She can move some with her arms mostly and does show some emotion, but is unable to talk due to the trach still being in (she doesn’t need it anymore) and I am not sure that she would be able to talk even without it. I have also read a lot about clipping and coiling. They did not do anything with hers, they just inserted a drain that they kept in for almost 2 weeks. Then they did ct scans for another 2 months and said that she did not have any re-bleeding. It just seems she is recovering at a VERY slow rate. Most of the articles I read mostly talk about recovery from coiling or clipping. I can’t find many articles on recovery from an aneurysm. I realize that everyone recovers at different rates but it seems she is not recovering at a “normal” rate. She does have an appointment on Wednesday with the neurologist. I guess it is just frustrating on both ends, hers and ours. Does anyone have any insight on this? Thanks

Every aneurysm is different. It sounds as if your mother’s burst. There’s a huge difference between mine, which was found before it burst, and will be clipped before it bursts (we hope), and someone who had surgery after a rupture.

Recovery from an aneurysm depends on whether it was found before it burst or not. Once it has burst the results can range from sudden death to return to normal - and the return to normal can range from weeks or months or years or decades or never quite the same.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, and it can be coiled, then the affects are the most minor possible.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, but can’t be coiled and must be clipped, then the surgery is more serious, the hospital stay longer, and the chances of affects from the surgery itself are higher. The recovery from that varies between being back to normal within a few days to having life-long challenges with one thing or another.

If the aneurysm bursts, which is what it souns like happened to your mother, then the part of the brain that was damaged and how badly it was damaged depend on where the aneurysm was and how big it was.

Confusing, I know.

If you have more information about what happened to your mother it’ll be easier to find out what to expect.

Best wishes to you and yours

Laurie

Yes her aneurysm did burst and she did lose consciousness immediately (it is diagnosed as subarachnoid hemmorage/massive aneurysmal) She was breathing on her own until about 2 hours after it happened. Then she was on a ventilator for about a week and a half. She has been in the nursing home since she was released from the hospital. Her responses now are minimal. Mostly what i am seeing in Anger and Frustration (she has punched everyone in the family now as well as most of the nurses) She is starting to shake her head yes and no but not on a regular basis. Like I said it is just getting frustrating. I was really getting concerned about her non-progress. The neurosurgeon said if we didn’t see any response in 6 months he didn’t know what to tell us.

Laurie Campbell said:

Every aneurysm is different. It sounds as if your mother’s burst. There’s a huge difference between mine, which was found before it burst, and will be clipped before it bursts (we hope), and someone who had surgery after a rupture.

Recovery from an aneurysm depends on whether it was found before it burst or not. Once it has burst the results can range from sudden death to return to normal - and the return to normal can range from weeks or months or years or decades or never quite the same.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, and it can be coiled, then the affects are the most minor possible.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, but can’t be coiled and must be clipped, then the surgery is more serious, the hospital stay longer, and the chances of affects from the surgery itself are higher. The recovery from that varies between being back to normal within a few days to having life-long challenges with one thing or another.

If the aneurysm bursts, which is what it souns like happened to your mother, then the part of the brain that was damaged and how badly it was damaged depend on where the aneurysm was and how big it was.

Confusing, I know.

If you have more information about what happened to your mother it’ll be easier to find out what to expect.

Best wishes to you and yours

Laurie

That’s very hard. When your mother’s aneurysm burst it will have damaged her brain. Her lack of progress can be because of the amount of damage, or because of what was damaged. She can’t fight her way back if she doesn’t know she needs to, and doesn’t know she can.

One of the ways to ‘re-connect’ with someone is to have familiar faces, voices, and things. Music she used to love, the kinds of stories she used to enjoy - or whatever you can think of that meant a lot to her.

The anger and frustration is fully understandable - imagine if you woke up to find yourself somewhere you didn’t recognise, and you couldn’t talk! As long as she’s fighting, you have a chance to get her back. it’s when there’s no fight that there’s no hope.

Sounds like it’s going to be a long haul.

(hug)

Laurie

Tanya Banfield said:

Yes her aneurysm did burst and she did lose consciousness immediately (it is diagnosed as subarachnoid hemmorage/massive aneurysmal) She was breathing on her own until about 2 hours after it happened. Then she was on a ventilator for about a week and a half. She has been in the nursing home since she was released from the hospital. Her responses now are minimal. Mostly what i am seeing in Anger and Frustration (she has punched everyone in the family now as well as most of the nurses) She is starting to shake her head yes and no but not on a regular basis. Like I said it is just getting frustrating. I was really getting concerned about her non-progress. The neurosurgeon said if we didn’t see any response in 6 months he didn’t know what to tell us.


Laurie Campbell said:
Every aneurysm is different. It sounds as if your mother’s burst. There’s a huge difference between mine, which was found before it burst, and will be clipped before it bursts (we hope), and someone who had surgery after a rupture.

Recovery from an aneurysm depends on whether it was found before it burst or not. Once it has burst the results can range from sudden death to return to normal - and the return to normal can range from weeks or months or years or decades or never quite the same.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, and it can be coiled, then the affects are the most minor possible.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, but can’t be coiled and must be clipped, then the surgery is more serious, the hospital stay longer, and the chances of affects from the surgery itself are higher. The recovery from that varies between being back to normal within a few days to having life-long challenges with one thing or another.

If the aneurysm bursts, which is what it souns like happened to your mother, then the part of the brain that was damaged and how badly it was damaged depend on where the aneurysm was and how big it was.

Confusing, I know.

If you have more information about what happened to your mother it’ll be easier to find out what to expect.

Best wishes to you and yours

Laurie

Thank you Laurie! We have been trying to keep familiar things around her and try to work with her to remember how to do things and remember things that made her happy. That is part of the problem they couldn’t tell us what part of the brain was damaged if any. They only did a few ct scans after discharge from the hospital and didn’t see any re-bleeds so the neurosurgeon released her but I hadn’t recieved any info regarding referral to a neurologist. At that time they couldn’t determine the damage because it was still enlarged from the rupture. Hoping and praying the neurologist can help us with that. Yes it is definately going to be a long haul but she is and always has been strong and a fighter!

Thank you again Laurie!
Laurie Campbell said:

That’s very hard. When your mother’s aneurysm burst it will have damaged her brain. Her lack of progress can be because of the amount of damage, or because of what was damaged. She can’t fight her way back if she doesn’t know she needs to, and doesn’t know she can.


One of the ways to ‘re-connect’ with someone is to have familiar faces, voices, and things. Music she used to love, the kinds of stories she used to enjoy - or whatever you can think of that meant a lot to her.



The anger and frustration is fully understandable - imagine if you woke up to find yourself somewhere you didn’t recognise, and you couldn’t talk! As long as she’s fighting, you have a chance to get her back. it’s when there’s no fight that there’s no hope.



Sounds like it’s going to be a long haul.



(hug)



Laurie



Tanya Banfield said:
Yes her aneurysm did burst and she did lose consciousness immediately (it is diagnosed as subarachnoid hemmorage/massive aneurysmal) She was breathing on her own until about 2 hours after it happened. Then she was on a ventilator for about a week and a half. She has been in the nursing home since she was released from the hospital. Her responses now are minimal. Mostly what i am seeing in Anger and Frustration (she has punched everyone in the family now as well as most of the nurses) She is starting to shake her head yes and no but not on a regular basis. Like I said it is just getting frustrating. I was really getting concerned about her non-progress. The neurosurgeon said if we didn’t see any response in 6 months he didn’t know what to tell us.

Laurie Campbell said:
Every aneurysm is different. It sounds as if your mother’s burst. There’s a huge difference between mine, which was found before it burst, and will be clipped before it bursts (we hope), and someone who had surgery after a rupture.

Recovery from an aneurysm depends on whether it was found before it burst or not. Once it has burst the results can range from sudden death to return to normal - and the return to normal can range from weeks or months or years or decades or never quite the same.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, and it can be coiled, then the affects are the most minor possible.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, but can’t be coiled and must be clipped, then the surgery is more serious, the hospital stay longer, and the chances of affects from the surgery itself are higher. The recovery from that varies between being back to normal within a few days to having life-long challenges with one thing or another.

If the aneurysm bursts, which is what it souns like happened to your mother, then the part of the brain that was damaged and how badly it was damaged depend on where the aneurysm was and how big it was.

Confusing, I know.

If you have more information about what happened to your mother it’ll be easier to find out what to expect.

Best wishes to you and yours

Laurie

good morning tonya,
being a survivor of a ruptured anny,5mm, the surgeon coiled mine. for some reason after your released from the hospital, or maybe just in my case, its pretty much up to you or family members to get the referrals for your moms rehabilitation…your mother sounds like a tuff cookie, like alot of women are…lol…
and im sure with all your determination and diligence she will pull thru this, just dont ever give up on her she needs your constant encouragement and support…i will keep you and your family in my prayers and ask God to help your mother,many blessings and much love michelle n texas…stay strong…
Tanya Banfield said:

Thank you Laurie! We have been trying to keep familiar things around her and try to work with her to remember how to do things and remember things that made her happy. That is part of the problem they couldn’t tell us what part of the brain was damaged if any. They only did a few ct scans after discharge from the hospital and didn’t see any re-bleeds so the neurosurgeon released her but I hadn’t recieved any info regarding referral to a neurologist. At that time they couldn’t determine the damage because it was still enlarged from the rupture. Hoping and praying the neurologist can help us with that. Yes it is definately going to be a long haul but she is and always has been strong and a fighter!

Thank you again Laurie!
Laurie Campbell said:
That’s very hard. When your mother’s aneurysm burst it will have damaged her brain. Her lack of progress can be because of the amount of damage, or because of what was damaged. She can’t fight her way back if she doesn’t know she needs to, and doesn’t know she can.

One of the ways to ‘re-connect’ with someone is to have familiar faces, voices, and things. Music she used to love, the kinds of stories she used to enjoy - or whatever you can think of that meant a lot to her.

The anger and frustration is fully understandable - imagine if you woke up to find yourself somewhere you didn’t recognise, and you couldn’t talk! As long as she’s fighting, you have a chance to get her back. it’s when there’s no fight that there’s no hope.

Sounds like it’s going to be a long haul.

(hug)

Laurie

Tanya Banfield said:
Yes her aneurysm did burst and she did lose consciousness immediately (it is diagnosed as subarachnoid hemmorage/massive aneurysmal) She was breathing on her own until about 2 hours after it happened. Then she was on a ventilator for about a week and a half. She has been in the nursing home since she was released from the hospital. Her responses now are minimal. Mostly what i am seeing in Anger and Frustration (she has punched everyone in the family now as well as most of the nurses) She is starting to shake her head yes and no but not on a regular basis. Like I said it is just getting frustrating. I was really getting concerned about her non-progress. The neurosurgeon said if we didn’t see any response in 6 months he didn’t know what to tell us.

Laurie Campbell said:
Every aneurysm is different. It sounds as if your mother’s burst. There’s a huge difference between mine, which was found before it burst, and will be clipped before it bursts (we hope), and someone who had surgery after a rupture.

Recovery from an aneurysm depends on whether it was found before it burst or not. Once it has burst the results can range from sudden death to return to normal - and the return to normal can range from weeks or months or years or decades or never quite the same.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, and it can be coiled, then the affects are the most minor possible.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, but can’t be coiled and must be clipped, then the surgery is more serious, the hospital stay longer, and the chances of affects from the surgery itself are higher. The recovery from that varies between being back to normal within a few days to having life-long challenges with one thing or another.

If the aneurysm bursts, which is what it souns like happened to your mother, then the part of the brain that was damaged and how badly it was damaged depend on where the aneurysm was and how big it was.

Confusing, I know.

If you have more information about what happened to your mother it’ll be easier to find out what to expect.

Best wishes to you and yours

Laurie

Thank you for the prayers! It has been rough as far as the rehab. We are struggling to get the therapies started… again. The nursing home is a little reluctant because they have tried several times before and she didn’t respond. She was released with PT, OT, and Speech Therapy… But since she didn’t respond the had to stop. We managed to get them to try again to no avail… And now we can’t get them to start again. They are getting her out of bed on a daily basis though and I think that has helped… after much convincing. She is very tough and even when the nursing home thought they would never see improvement I never gave up on her coming out of it. Through MANY prayers and strength she came out of the coma! I try to stay strong for her but it is tough sometimes!

Thank you! I am really happy I have found this group! It has helped me a Lot!

michelle patterson said:

good morning tonya,
being a survivor of a ruptured anny,5mm, the surgeon coiled mine. for some reason after your released from the hospital, or maybe just in my case, its pretty much up to you or family members to get the referrals for your moms rehabilitation…your mother sounds like a tuff cookie, like alot of women are…lol…
and im sure with all your determination and diligence she will pull thru this, just dont ever give up on her she needs your constant encouragement and support…i will keep you and your family in my prayers and ask God to help your mother,many blessings and much love michelle n texas…stay strong…
Tanya Banfield said:
Thank you Laurie! We have been trying to keep familiar things around her and try to work with her to remember how to do things and remember things that made her happy. That is part of the problem they couldn’t tell us what part of the brain was damaged if any. They only did a few ct scans after discharge from the hospital and didn’t see any re-bleeds so the neurosurgeon released her but I hadn’t recieved any info regarding referral to a neurologist. At that time they couldn’t determine the damage because it was still enlarged from the rupture. Hoping and praying the neurologist can help us with that. Yes it is definately going to be a long haul but she is and always has been strong and a fighter!

Thank you again Laurie!
Laurie Campbell said:
That’s very hard. When your mother’s aneurysm burst it will have damaged her brain. Her lack of progress can be because of the amount of damage, or because of what was damaged. She can’t fight her way back if she doesn’t know she needs to, and doesn’t know she can.

One of the ways to ‘re-connect’ with someone is to have familiar faces, voices, and things. Music she used to love, the kinds of stories she used to enjoy - or whatever you can think of that meant a lot to her.

The anger and frustration is fully understandable - imagine if you woke up to find yourself somewhere you didn’t recognise, and you couldn’t talk! As long as she’s fighting, you have a chance to get her back. it’s when there’s no fight that there’s no hope.

Sounds like it’s going to be a long haul.

(hug)

Laurie

Tanya Banfield said:
Yes her aneurysm did burst and she did lose consciousness immediately (it is diagnosed as subarachnoid hemmorage/massive aneurysmal) She was breathing on her own until about 2 hours after it happened. Then she was on a ventilator for about a week and a half. She has been in the nursing home since she was released from the hospital. Her responses now are minimal. Mostly what i am seeing in Anger and Frustration (she has punched everyone in the family now as well as most of the nurses) She is starting to shake her head yes and no but not on a regular basis. Like I said it is just getting frustrating. I was really getting concerned about her non-progress. The neurosurgeon said if we didn’t see any response in 6 months he didn’t know what to tell us.

Laurie Campbell said:
Every aneurysm is different. It sounds as if your mother’s burst. There’s a huge difference between mine, which was found before it burst, and will be clipped before it bursts (we hope), and someone who had surgery after a rupture.

Recovery from an aneurysm depends on whether it was found before it burst or not. Once it has burst the results can range from sudden death to return to normal - and the return to normal can range from weeks or months or years or decades or never quite the same.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, and it can be coiled, then the affects are the most minor possible.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, but can’t be coiled and must be clipped, then the surgery is more serious, the hospital stay longer, and the chances of affects from the surgery itself are higher. The recovery from that varies between being back to normal within a few days to having life-long challenges with one thing or another.

If the aneurysm bursts, which is what it souns like happened to your mother, then the part of the brain that was damaged and how badly it was damaged depend on where the aneurysm was and how big it was.

Confusing, I know.

If you have more information about what happened to your mother it’ll be easier to find out what to expect.

Best wishes to you and yours

Laurie

look at that >>>she came out of the coma,she can do it just keep pusing her and she may get mad, but translate that into frustration on her part to want to get better…

Tanya Banfield said:

Thank you for the prayers! It has been rough as far as the rehab. We are struggling to get the therapies started… again. The nursing home is a little reluctant because they have tried several times before and she didn’t respond. She was released with PT, OT, and Speech Therapy… But since she didn’t respond the had to stop. We managed to get them to try again to no avail… And now we can’t get them to start again. They are getting her out of bed on a daily basis though and I think that has helped… after much convincing. She is very tough and even when the nursing home thought they would never see improvement I never gave up on her coming out of it. Through MANY prayers and strength she came out of the coma! I try to stay strong for her but it is tough sometimes!

Thank you! I am really happy I have found this group! It has helped me a Lot!

michelle patterson said:
good morning tonya,
being a survivor of a ruptured anny,5mm, the surgeon coiled mine. for some reason after your released from the hospital, or maybe just in my case, its pretty much up to you or family members to get the referrals for your moms rehabilitation…your mother sounds like a tuff cookie, like alot of women are…lol…
and im sure with all your determination and diligence she will pull thru this, just dont ever give up on her she needs your constant encouragement and support…i will keep you and your family in my prayers and ask God to help your mother,many blessings and much love michelle n texas…stay strong…
Tanya Banfield said:
Thank you Laurie! We have been trying to keep familiar things around her and try to work with her to remember how to do things and remember things that made her happy. That is part of the problem they couldn’t tell us what part of the brain was damaged if any. They only did a few ct scans after discharge from the hospital and didn’t see any re-bleeds so the neurosurgeon released her but I hadn’t recieved any info regarding referral to a neurologist. At that time they couldn’t determine the damage because it was still enlarged from the rupture. Hoping and praying the neurologist can help us with that. Yes it is definately going to be a long haul but she is and always has been strong and a fighter!

Thank you again Laurie!
Laurie Campbell said:
That’s very hard. When your mother’s aneurysm burst it will have damaged her brain. Her lack of progress can be because of the amount of damage, or because of what was damaged. She can’t fight her way back if she doesn’t know she needs to, and doesn’t know she can.

One of the ways to ‘re-connect’ with someone is to have familiar faces, voices, and things. Music she used to love, the kinds of stories she used to enjoy - or whatever you can think of that meant a lot to her.

The anger and frustration is fully understandable - imagine if you woke up to find yourself somewhere you didn’t recognise, and you couldn’t talk! As long as she’s fighting, you have a chance to get her back. it’s when there’s no fight that there’s no hope.

Sounds like it’s going to be a long haul.

(hug)

Laurie

Tanya Banfield said:
Yes her aneurysm did burst and she did lose consciousness immediately (it is diagnosed as subarachnoid hemmorage/massive aneurysmal) She was breathing on her own until about 2 hours after it happened. Then she was on a ventilator for about a week and a half. She has been in the nursing home since she was released from the hospital. Her responses now are minimal. Mostly what i am seeing in Anger and Frustration (she has punched everyone in the family now as well as most of the nurses) She is starting to shake her head yes and no but not on a regular basis. Like I said it is just getting frustrating. I was really getting concerned about her non-progress. The neurosurgeon said if we didn’t see any response in 6 months he didn’t know what to tell us.

Laurie Campbell said:
Every aneurysm is different. It sounds as if your mother’s burst. There’s a huge difference between mine, which was found before it burst, and will be clipped before it bursts (we hope), and someone who had surgery after a rupture.

Recovery from an aneurysm depends on whether it was found before it burst or not. Once it has burst the results can range from sudden death to return to normal - and the return to normal can range from weeks or months or years or decades or never quite the same.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, and it can be coiled, then the affects are the most minor possible.

If the aneurysm is found before it bursts, but can’t be coiled and must be clipped, then the surgery is more serious, the hospital stay longer, and the chances of affects from the surgery itself are higher. The recovery from that varies between being back to normal within a few days to having life-long challenges with one thing or another.

If the aneurysm bursts, which is what it souns like happened to your mother, then the part of the brain that was damaged and how badly it was damaged depend on where the aneurysm was and how big it was.

Confusing, I know.

If you have more information about what happened to your mother it’ll be easier to find out what to expect.

Best wishes to you and yours

Laurie

Hey, this is old! Closing it to posts, feel free to start a new thread