5 months later

My husband is on his 5 months Anniversary. This week he has been asking people for cigarettes. He did smoke when this happen. I don’t know if I should let. Him smoke again or not. Any advice please

smoking is a big risk factor for rupture so if he develops or has already other annies then it's not a good idea. I was told very firmly by my neuro to quit after I had my rupture (I got out of hospital and took it up again) so it's probably not a good idea. the problem is that when we have a rupture we dont remember a lot of it, so to him it may seem like he never stopped.

A difficult question...first...which cigarettes?...How many additives?

Hi, gentlewolf, there is some information on smoking from the BAF website that I would recommend you share with your husband: http://www.bafound.org/search/node/smoking

Also, if you type "smoking" in the search box at the upper right corner of this page, you can see a number of past discussions about smoking.

Smoking is not only bad for general health but particularly risky for annie survivors. I understand that your husband is the one who will make this decision for himself, but sharing information with him and bringing the issue up at his next doctor's appointment may be helpful. All the best to you!



Dancermom said:

Hi, gentlewolf, there is some information on smoking from the BAF website that I would recommend you share with your husband: http://www.bafound.org/search/node/smoking

Also, if you type "smoking" in the search box at the upper right corner of this page, you can see a number of past discussions about smoking.

Smoking is not only bad for general health but particularly risky for annie survivors. I understand that your husband is the one who will make this decision for himself, but sharing information with him and bringing the issue up at his next doctor's appointment may be helpful. All the best to you!

Thank you so much dance mom. This is the first time I got some help. I know you all say go to care giver site but I need response from survivors. How else do you know what they are going thru. So thank you so very much

Gentlewolf, get it off you and put it on the doctor. Have your husband take responsibility and let him ask his doctor. Basically I had no blood pressure issues until the day of my rupture. After all the vasospasms and the doc having to keep my blood pressure up so high, I still have no issues. My veins and arteries are clear for a person of 54. Despite having smoked, my lungs are clear and I was given an estimate of someone in their 20’s. I never craved cigarettes in ICU. I did start craving them about four months later. My partner did not stop smoking and though we never smoked in the house, I could smell it. I restarted and my doc got very, very frustrated with me. For some reason, I hate disappointing her. So now I’m trying to quit again. It was easier in ICU. My doc said they aren’t sure what causes aneurysms, but they do know that cigarette smoking causes problems with veins and arteries. Since your brain relies on your veins and arteries to give it blood, I would think one would want to keep them as healthy as possible. And it really doesn’t matter what type he smokes, they all mess with the blood flow.

This is what I’m doing now when I want to smoke - do one of my hobbies - I’m relearning to carve wood and I do Zentangle (link in Mindfulness Group). I go for a walk, I go out with friends who don’t smoke, or I’m on here. Basically anything to keep my hands and mind busy. I would suggest he get a hobby instead. My Dad had ischemic strokes and quit smoking three packs a day. As a child, I remember rolling his cigarettes for him every Sunday night. He and my mother used hypnotherapy. That was over thirty years ago! When he craves cigarettes, he eats citrus. For some reason, citrus takes the craving away. I don’t remember if it was because of the hypnotherapist, or just a new habit they picked up.

Also suggest he brushes his teeth when he wants one. I don’t know many smokers who smoke after they brush their teeth. Don’t allow anyone to smoke in the house. He is going to have to want to do this for himself. Start with the Doctor, perhaps he will listen more to the doctor than you. Also I’d ask why he wants to start back again - perhaps he doesn’t really remember he quit, perhaps he is in pain, perhaps he is bored, but maybe he just needs or wants something that is familiar to him. Good Luck!

Thank you

I know that I had one heck of a time quitting. My neurosurgeon politely told me everytime I saw him that smoking can cause more annies (I have had 2 - one in the brain and one in my jugular). I knew I should. The patch never worked - I asked my PCP to ask my insurance for the oral spray. My insurance would only authorize the nose spray. It worked - I was able to stop smoking completely, but then I thought I was addicted to the nose spray. I did use it for months afterward, then stopped cold turkey. Not a problem. I am confronted by people I know that still smoke, but I know better than to let myself have that "one" cigarette. That "one" cigarette could get me started again and it took a long time (and many health problems) to stop.

I hope your husband can avoid that, but I also know it is probably sticky on your end to not let him have that smoke. Good luck on that - it must be very hard on your part. Stay strong.

Sherri

This is my 3rd quit. Twice I used the patch and made it close to 2 years each time. This time I have an e cig and it is working for me. I would say it is a gentler and less stressful way to put the cigarettes down. Either way, I am certain that you must quit for yourself in order to succeed. Having the support of your doctor and family certainly helps the process though.